Sea Talk Video - Snowy Owls

It could easily be a scene out of Harry Potter: suddenly, daytime sightings of bright, white owls are reported throughout Delaware. But these snowy owls aren’t an act of fiction – their arrival in the region is called an irruption, resulting from an abundance of their native food being available the previous summer.

Publication Date:
Thursday, January 1, 2015

Episode Script

This is SeaTalk: Ocean News from the University of Delaware.

It could easily be a scene out of Harry Potter: suddenly, daytime sightings of bright, white owls are reported throughout Delaware. But these snowy owls aren’t an act of fiction – their arrival in the region is called an irruption, resulting from an abundance of their native food being available the previous summer.

That food is small rodents, called lemmings. More lemmings leads to more juvenile owls being able to mature into adults. The resulting population boom pushes these large, stunning birds of prey south from their Arctic range in the winter. Unlike other types of owls, they are diurnal, making it easier for birdwatchers to spot them as they hunt prey in the daylight hours.

This is SeaTalk, a public service announcement from the University of Delaware, the Delaware Sea Grant College Program, and this station.

Sea Talk Video - Snowy Owls

Page Updated on January 1, 2015